— Shared 4 days ago - 7,581 notes - via / Source - reblog

immigrantgirls:

rly i encourage all the girls of colour, esp black girls, to invade creative spaces that are occupied by white women. the exclusion of girls of colour in creative spaces is a conscious decision, dont walk around believing that it’s just a coincidence. if u see only white girls on a staff page, know there’s a reason behind that. and dont let that shit thrive. let ppl kno u r alive. 


— Shared 4 days ago - 86,574 notes - via / Source - reblog

wocinsolidarity:

Attanya: #WeNeedDiverseBooks because I love science fiction and fantasy books, but I’m tired of authors treating dragons and robots and magic as more plausible than black and brown characters

Jennifer: #WeNeedDiverseBooks because… when I was 13 a white girl told me it was selfishthat all of the protagonists in my stories were Latina because she “just can’t relate to nonwhite characters.” She made me feel guilty for writing about people like me. 

Aiesha: #WeNeedDiverseBooks because…Black Girls are more than sidekicks or “sassy, ghetto friend”

Facts and Figures About Race/Ethnicity in YA and Children’s Lit:

#WENEEDDIVERSEBOOKS

Posting this a little late, but followers please take the time out to check out this post explaining the #WeNeedDiverseBooks campaign and more events to come over the next few days! 


— Shared 6 days ago - 33,531 notes - via / Source - reblog

mumblingsage:

jenny-roses:

goldenheartedrose:

falconwhitaker:

bookgeekconfessions:

I wanted to double check that “The Cherry on Top” was a short novel or novella and I found this on uphillwriting.org. I think it’s very informative and hopefully you guys will find it useful!

Good friends, this list is wonderful, but it’s missing something!

Internet Articles

800 words maximum

OOH.

this is the most beautiful thing i’ve seen today.

HOWEVER, internet articles can actually go quite a bit longer—the first-page Google results are usually 2,000 words or more. 


— Shared 1 week ago - 9,032 notes - via / Source - reblog
“
Most writers were the kids who easily, almost automatically, got A’s in English class. (There are exceptions, but they often also seem to be exceptions to the general writerly habit of putting off writing as long as possible.) At an early age, when grammar school teachers were struggling to inculcate the lesson that effort was the main key to success in school, these future scribblers gave the obvious lie to this assertion. Where others read haltingly, they were plowing two grades ahead in the reading workbooks. These are the kids who turned in a completed YA novel for their fifth-grade project. It isn’t that they never failed, but at a very early age, they didn’t have to fail much; their natural talents kept them at the head of the class.

This teaches a very bad, very false lesson: that success in work mostly depends on natural talent. Unfortunately, when you are a professional writer, you are competing with all the other kids who were at the top of their English classes. Your stuff may not—indeed, probably won’t—be the best anymore.

If you’ve spent most of your life cruising ahead on natural ability, doing what came easily and quickly, every word you write becomes a test of just how much ability you have, every article a referendum on how good a writer you are. As long as you have not written that article, that speech, that novel, it could still be good. Before you take to the keys, you are Proust and Oscar Wilde and George Orwell all rolled up into one delicious package. By the time you’re finished, you’re more like one of those 1940’s pulp hacks who strung hundred-page paragraphs together with semicolons because it was too much effort to figure out where the sentence should end.
—

Why Writers Are the Worst Procrastinators - Megan McArdle - The Atlantic

The Why Writing Is So Hard field of psychology is very interesting to me.

(via amyelizabeth)



— Shared 1 week ago - 22,921 notes - via / Source - reblog
“

“If you really believe that representation doesn’t matter, then why the fuck are you threatened by it? If not seeing yourself depicted in stories has no negative psychological impact - if the breakdown of who we see on screen has no bearing on wider social issues - then what would it matter if nine stories out of ten were suddenly all about queer brown women? No big, right? It wouldn’t change anything important; just a few superficial details. Because YOU can identify with ANYONE.

So I guess the problem is that you just don’t want to. Because deep down, you think it’ll make stories worse. And why is that? Oh, yeah: because it means they wouldn’t all be about YOU.”


— Shared 4 weeks ago - 7,051 notes - via / Source - reblog
“
Isn’t it time to acknowledge the ugly side? I’ve grown quite weary of the spunky heroines, brave rape victims, soul-searching fashionistas that stock so many books. I particularly mourn the lack of female villains — good, potent female villains. Not ill-tempered women who scheme about landing good men and better shoes (as if we had nothing more interesting to war over), not chilly WASP mothers (emotionally distant isn’t necessarily evil), not soapy vixens (merely bitchy doesn’t qualify either). I’m talking violent, wicked women. Scary women. Don’t tell me you don’t know some. The point is, women have spent so many years girl-powering ourselves — to the point of almost parodic encouragement — we’ve left no room to acknowledge our dark side. Dark sides are important. They should be nurtured like nasty black orchids.
— Gillian Flynn (via carbon-anniversary)

— Shared 1 month ago - 80,128 notes - via / Source - reblog

stannisbaratheon:

@WorstMuse is a relic of the human race


— Shared 1 month ago - 1,217 notes - via / Source - reblog
“
A tough life needs a tough language—and that is what poetry is. That is what literature offers—a language powerful enough to say how it is.
— Jeanette Winterson (via observando)

— Shared 1 month ago - 8 notes - via / Source - reblog
“
Writing, to me, is simply thinking through my fingers.
— Isaac Asimov